Nabokov and the Task of Writing

Nabokov and the Task of Writing

https://mgcobb.com/2020/12/16/nabokov-and-the-task-of-writing/

Okay. I admit it. The abiding controversy surrounding Lolita notwithstanding, I’m a huge fan of Russian novelist Vladimir Nabokov.
Of his considerable body of work, perhaps my favorite novel is Pale Fire. The story centers on John Shade, a reclusive poet who writes a 999-line poem about his life and speculation of what will befall him when he ultimately leaves this earth. The novel includes extensive commentary by his crazy neighbor, Charles Kinbote, who encourages him to write about his, Kinbote’s, own homeland, the kingdom of Zembla. Lest I
give away too much of the story, I’ll refrain from telling more, but needless to say, the novel is rich with a panoply of dizzying narrative, fantastical imaginations, twists, turns, and madness.
Literary, video and music critic Tim Appelo proclaimed: “Like Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov’s Pale Fire is a masterpiece that imprisons us inside the mazelike head of a mad émigré.” I couldn’t have said it better.
But what intrigues me almost as much as the content and style of Nabokov’s work is how he went about the task of writing itself.
Nabokov produced almost all of his work on 3x5 index cards, which he would organize, shuffle, annotate, scribble afterthoughts, reorganize until the narrative was the way he wanted it. His works could easily consume between 1,000 and 2,000 cards. Read more details here…https://mgcobb.com/2020/12/16/nabokov-and-the-task-of-writing/

I write because that is fundamentally who I am. My body of work includes both non-fiction and fiction. Both short form and long form.